Imagined Audiences: How Journalists Perceive and Pursue the Public

Imagined Audiences draws on ethnographic case studies of three news organizations to reveal how journalists’ assumptions about their audiences shape their approaches to their audiences. Jacob L. Nelson examines the role that audiences have traditionally played in journalism, how that role has changed, and what those changes mean for both the profession and the public.

Practical power sharing: How Might We Create Opportunities for Power Sharing With Communities Through Stories?

This open, community document by P. Kim Bui is intended to present and evaluate different storytelling techniques that demonstrate what power sharing and true audience involvement look like in journalistic organizations. It aims to do so by breaking down barriers between communities and reignites the journalist as listener and convener, helping to heal wounds and build relationships.

KQED Source Diversity

The goal of the audit is to provide a baseline understanding of KQED’s source diversity using five measures: gender, race/ethnicity, age group, geographic location, and profession. These data will be used in the creation of a sustainable source diversity tracking system, as well as to help inform decision-making and goal setting.

Media 2070 for media reparations

Free Press is launching “Media 2070,” an in-depth research essay and organizing hub that documents and analyzes the history of media harm. Alicia Bell from Free Press talks about the origins and goals of the project, how they plan to engage their communities, and how you can stay in touch.

Forming a community advisory board for your newsroom

Community editorial boards or advisory boards are one way to start your journalism from a place of listening. Depending on the board’s makeup and recruitment processes, they can point you toward stories that have gone uncovered and people whose information needs are not being met. And they can help you repair relationships with groups that are often marginalized or misrepresented by the news media.

The Spectrum of Community Engagement to Ownership

The Spectrum of Community Engagement to Ownership charts a pathway to strengthen and transform our local democracies. Thriving, diverse, equitable communities are possible through deep participation, particularly by communities commonly excluded from democratic voice & power. The stronger our local democracies, the more capacity we can unleash to address our toughest challenges, and the more capable we are of surviving and thriving through economic, ecological, and social crises. Via: Rosa Gonzales on Facilitating Power.

A Manifesto for a People’s Newsroom

The Bureau Local is a people-powered network setting the news agenda and sparking change, from the ground up. Over the past three years we have set out to make sure news is working for everyone and to do so, we’ve been changing the way it’s done. Whether it is austerity or Brexit, health or education, people across the UK experience inequality in their treatment and how their stories are told, if told at all. That’s why we focus our journalism on shining a light on the power, decisions and policies that threaten the public interest of all people across the UK.

How Can We Emerge from the Pandemic with the Journalism We Need?

Elements of these shifts in journalism are already in motion. The emergent paradigm resulting from these efforts is changing how journalists listen, tell stories, engage, and support their communities in imagining a better future. Philanthropy, which has already moved in this direction, can provide a vital bridge to support the emergence of the journalism we need today.